Translations

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Pedro Vergés’ ASHES (BOLERO): AN ENGLISH TRANSLATION WITH MARGARITE FERNÁNDEZ OLMOS.

Sólo Cenizas Hallarás (Bolero), published in 1982, is a classic Dominican novel by professor and diplomat Pedro Vergés, since 2016 the country’s Minister of Culture. A novel of great range and power, it follows a number of characters form different social and political strata as they face the turmoil of the period before and after the assassination of Dominican strongman Rafael Leonidas Trujillo. Manuscript under review.


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HEEDING THE CHANT OF THE CARIBBEAN SEA/AU CHANT DE LA MER CARAÏBE: SELECTED POEMS BY DANIEL THALY.

Bilingual edition in progress. Translations by Mark Andrews and Lizabeth Paravisini-Gebert, introduction by Mark Andrews. London: Papillote Press, 2022.

Daniel Thaly (1878-1950) was a Dominican/Martinican poet now chiefly forgotten but whose verses had won him extensive fame in the early twentieth century. He commemorated the tragedy of Mont Pelée through poems whose evocation of the Antillean landscape is etched with the searing pain of the loss of so many friends when the town of St. Pierre was destroyed by the 1902 eruption. The loss of twenty-nine thousand lives within minutes of the main eruption touched Thaly profoundly, as he had been for many years a student at the Lycée St. Pierre and lost relatives, former classmates, teachers, and lifetime friends. He will return again and again to the eruption as a theme in his poetry, as a sort of leit motif that permeates all the collections. But the concreteness of Thaly’s evocations are not limited to the destruction of St. Pierre-they form the core of a profoundly autobiographical element in his poetry, through which he often constructs a version of himself as a citizen divided between Roseau and the St. Pierre that vanished under a cloud of ash while he was away.

This edition, the first to make his work available in English, seeks to reclaim a place for him among the most important writers of 20th-century Dominica.


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HOW TO GATHER THE SHADOWS OF THE FLOWERS AND OTHER STORIES BY ANGELA HERNÁNDEZ NÚÑEZ.

Edition and Introduction by Lizabeth Paravisini-Gebert and Ivette Romero-Cesareo. Translations by Lizabeth Paravisini-Gebert.

Manuscript under review.

Translation into English of a collection of short stories by Dominican writer Angela Hernández Nuñez. The stories, chosen by the author, represent the best of her work.

Hernández Nuñez is the Dominican Republic’s most prominent contemporary novelist. The winner of the National Literary Prize for 2016, she is a prolific and versatile author whose novels, short stories, poems and essays have been the subject of significant critical attention. Marcio Veloz Maggiolo, one of the Dominican Republic’s most respected critics, once declared that in her short stories Hernández Núñez had reached a summit in Dominican writing; the stories, he argued, surprised as much by the maturity and assuredness of their craft as by their “halo of mystery and a fine sense of poetry,” their “murmuring vision of love and enigmas.” The stories, above all, are characterized by a thrust to unveil what lies behind the worldly, terrestrial, and commonplace, to capture what eludes comprehension, what abides beyond the frontiers of the prosaic.

Image: from the Unalterable Limitations series by Firelei Báez

WHERE THE DREAM ENDS: SHORT STORIES BY JOSÉ ALCÁNTARA ALMANZAR.unnamed.jpg

Edition and introduction by Lizabeth Paravisini-Gebert and Cecilia Graña-Rosa. Translations by Lizabeth Paravisini-Gebert. Fort Lauderdale: Caribbean Studies Press, 2018.

The stories included in the project have been selected by the author himself and include representative examples from collections dating back to the early 1970s. He considers this selection to represent his best work. The volume is part of a four-part project that includes my translation of similar collections of short stories by Dominican authors Angela Hernández Nuñez (see below) and Pedro Peix, and my translation of Pedro Vergés’s 1980 novel, Sólo cenizas hallarás: bolero. The four authors are considered to be the Dominican Republic’s best contemporary writers and the completion of the larger project would bring their work some richly deserved international attention.


calidoperfidosfulgores033-200x300CÁLIDOS, PÉRFIDOS FULGORES: CUENTOS DE JEAN RHYS
[Spanish translation of Jean Rhys’ Sleep It Off Lady]. Barcelona: Verdecielo Ediciones, 2006.
Includes my translations into Spanish of the following stories: “Pioneers, Oh Pioneers,” ”Goodbye Marcus, Goodbye Rose,” “The Bishop’s Feast,” “Heat,” “Fishy Waters,” “Overtures and Beginners Please,” “Before the Deluge,” “On Not Shooting Sitting Birds,” “Kikimora,” “Night Out 1925,” “The Insect World,” “Rapunzel Rapunzel,” ”Who Knows What’s Up in the Attic?,” ”Sleep It Off Lady,” ”I Used to Live Here Once,””Making Cocktails,” ”Let Them Call It Jazz,” ”I Spy a Stranger,” ”The Imperial Road,” and “Invitation to the Dance.”
See below for link to texts.

FantabulososVuelos032-197x300LOS FANTABULOSOS VUELOS: CUENTOS DE MUJERES CARIBEÑAS

Edited with Carmen Esteves. Translations by Lizabeth Paravisini-Gebert. Barcelona: Verdecielo Ediciones, 2005.

An anthology of short stories by Caribbean women. It includes my translations into Spanish of: “Piano Bar” by Liliane Dévieux, “Fleur rouge” by Paulette Poujol-Oriol, “Un potage de lentils” by Marie-Thérèse Colimon-Hall, “Little Cog-burt” by Phyllis Shand Allfrey, “The Day They Burned the Books” by Jean Rhys, “Girl” by Jamaica Kincaid, “Bright Thursdays” by Olive Senior; “Columba” by Michelle Cliff, and “Station Opéra. Six heures du soir. Pendant des mois” by Jeanne Hyvrard.
See below for links to text.

Remaking-194x300REMAKING A LOST HARMONY: CONTEMPORARY FICTION FROM THE HISPANIC CARIBBEAN

[English translations with introduction]. Edited with Margarite Fernández Olmos. Fredonia, NY: White Pine Press, 1995. 250pp.

These diverse stories, all of which were written after the 1959 Cuban Revolution, reflect both the unique and colorful culture of the islands and the social changes that provided the impetus to search for the lost harmony of Caribbean and Latin American culture.”Wow! An important and timely collection of voices long known in the Caribbean…from this vital part of the hemisphere.” JULIA ALVAREZIncludes my translations of: “Corinne, Amiable Girl” by Mayra Montero, “Colonel Bum Vivant” by Rosario Ferré (translated with Rosario Ferré), “Silvia” by Verónica López Kónina, “The Marked One” by Norberto Fuentes, “The Fire” by Hilma Contreras, “Mambrú Did Not Go to War” by Aída Cartagena Portalatín, “What Do You Know, Vivian” by Luis García, “Emilio’s Visitations” by Roberto Montero, “The Blind Buffalo” by Mirta Yáñez, “Requiem for a Wreathless Corpse” by Pedro Peix, “Black Alleluia” by Luis Rafael Sánchez (translated with Margarite Fernández Olmos), “Lulu or the metamorphosis” by José Alcántara Almánzar, “Gnawing on a Rose” by Ángela Hernández, “This Noise was Different” by Olga Nolla, and “Liliane’s Sunday” By Ana Lydia Vega.
See below for links to texts.

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DIE FRAU IM SAND: EROTISCHE PHANTASIEN VON FRAUEN
[German translation of Pleasure in the Word by Susanne Keller]. München: Heyne, 1995.
German translation of El placer de la palabra—described below in its original Spanish edition.


PleasureandtheWord-201x300PLEASURE IN THE WORD: EROTIC WRITINGS BY LATIN AMERICAN WOMEN

[English translation with introduction]. Edited with Margarite Fernández Olmos. Fredonia, N.Y.: White Pine Press, 1993. Paperback editions: New York: Quality Paperbacks, 1994; New York: Plume, 1995; New York: NAL/Dutton, 1996.

English translation of El placer de la palabra—described below in its original Spanish edition.Includes my translations of: “Ausencia’s Tale,” from María Luisa Mendoza’s De Ausencia; “How to Gather the Shadows of the Flowers,” short story by Angela Hernández, “The Witness,” short story by Cristina Peri Rossi, “The House of the Angel,” from Beatriz Guido’s La casa del angel, “Alirio,” from Albalucía Angel’s Estaba la pájara pinta sentada en el verde limón, “Albino Orma,” short story by Silvina Ocampo, “Ca Foscari,” poem by Cristina Peri Rossi, “I Soar on the Wings,” poem by Nemir Matos, “On This Sunday’s Painful Loneliness,” poem by Gioconda Belli, “Amora,” from Amoraby Rosamaría Roffiel, and “The Final Mist,” from María Luisa Bombal’s La última niebla.
See below for links to texts.

juicyflot-188x300GREEN CANE AND JUICY FLOTSAM: SHORT STORIES BY CARIBBEAN WOMEN

[English translations with introduction]. Edited with Carmen C. Esteves. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 1991; rpt. 1992, 1994, 1996, 1998. 273pp.

This collection of short stories—chosen as a New York Times and Publisher’s Weekly “Notable Book” for 1991—features moving tales from the rich Caribbean oral tradition, stories that question women’s traditional roles, present women’s perspectives on the history of Caribbean slavery and colonialism, and convey the beautiful cadences of the language of Caribbean women. It offers the general reader a broad selection of the themes, styles, and techniques characteristic of contemporary women’s fiction in the Caribbean. Along with stories by well-known writers such as Jean Rhys, Jamaica Kincaid, Michelle Cliff, Maryse Condé, and Rosario Ferré, the anthology also includes first-rate stories by lesser-known but equally talented writers.  Includes my translations of “Piano Bar” by Liliane Dévieux, “Red Flower” by Paulette Poujol-Oriol, “How to Gather the Shadows of the Flowers” by Angela Hernández, “The Mane” by Hilma Contreras, “No Dust is Allowed in this House” by Olga Nolla, the anonymous “Tétiyette and the Devil,” and “A Pottage of Lentils” by Marie-Thérèse Colimon-Hall.
 “Unique . . . a wonderful collection that will receive much attention.” BARBARA CHRISTIAN
“The panorama of insights and visions is vast . . . the context of women’s writings is a broadening link, connecting these writers with their contemporaries in other cultures around the world.” GREGORY RABASSA
“Provides wonderful insights into writing by women from the Caribbean.”J. MICHAEL DASH